Posts Tagged ‘Policy’

N.C. Solar Center Releases Residential Customer Guides to Going Solar

Posted on: April 24th, 2014 by shannonhelm No Comments

 

Raleigh, N.C. – As part of its work under the U.S. Department of Energy’s SunShot Solar Outreach Partnership, the N.C. Solar Center today announces the release of two new original resources: A Residential Customer’s Guide to Going Solar: Duke Energy Carolinas version and A Residential Customer’s Guide to Going Solar: Duke Energy Progress version.

North Carolina was ranked second in the nation for installed solar capacity in 2013, installing 400 MW of new capacity and climbing up three places from 2012 (according to the NPD Solarbuzz North American PV Markets Quarterly report). Most of this capacity in North Carolina comes from utility-scale solar installations, which highlights an opportunity to advance solar even more in the state by focusing on rooftop installations. These guides will support this effort by educating customers about solar and clarifying many of the misconceptions about the cost of going solar.

The guides focus on explaining, in easy to understand terms, the different financial options available to homeowners interested in going solar. These are broken up into incentives that reduce the upfront cost of going solar, such as tax credits and Duke Energy Progress’ SunSense program, and payback options that credit you for the energy produced by your solar photovoltaic (PV) system, like net metering and N.C. GreenPower.

In addition to a description of these options, the guides include a detailed analysis of the monthly and long-term utility bill savings that each option provides to the typical homeowner, using data specific to North Carolina cities. This allows customers to get an idea of how much a solar system costs in their particular region after all available incentives are factored in, as well as what kind of utility bill savings a typical PV owner in their area sees.

Overall, the guides show that with an average-sized residential system at typical market prices, customers of Duke Energy in North Carolina can save up to an average of $55/ month for the next 25 years on their utility bill with a system that can cost as little as $4,000, after incentives.

Versions of the guides can be viewed here: Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress. For more information about the Department of Energy’s SunShot Solar Outreach Partnership, please visit www.solaroutreach.org.

 

About the North Carolina Solar Center

The North Carolina Solar Center, as part of the College of Engineering at North Carolina State University advances a sustainable energy economy by educating, demonstrating and providing support for clean energy technologies, practices, and policies. It serves as a resource for innovative, green energy technologies through technology demonstration, technical assistance, outreach and training. For more information about the N.C. Solar Center visit: http://www.ncsc.ncsu.edu. Twitter: @NCSolarCenter

 

Media Contact: Shannon Helm, N.C. Solar Center, 919-423-8340, shannon_helm@ncsu.edu

Solar Center releases new case study, “Harmonizing Solar PV Permitting and Interconnection”

Posted on: September 30th, 2013 by shannon No Comments

The N.C. Solar Center has released a case study focusing on the City of Santa Clara, CA’s streamlined approach to addressing permitting and interconnection. In Santa Clara, rooftop solar PV installers can get one-stop, over-the-counter permitting and interconnection review for residential solar installations under 10kW. This case study was completed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s SunShot Solar Outreach Partnership (SolarOPs).

Local governments with municipal utilities are uniquely positioned to perform permitting and interconnection reviews (and related inspections) for rooftop solar PV systems in an efficient and cost-effective manner, thereby reducing the “soft costs” associated with the system. Since the entire process is managed by the same municipal government, there exists an excellent opportunity to coordinate the permitting, inspection and interconnection process.

Click here for the full case study.

Property Taxes and Solar PV Systems: Policies, Practices and Issues report issued

Posted on: July 24th, 2013 by shannon No Comments

 

The N.C. Solar Center and Meister Consultants Group have released a report under the SunShot Solar Outreach Partnership on current state practices associated with the assessment and taxation of PV equipment. Property Taxes and Solar PV Systems: Policies, Practices, and Issues is intended as a resource for industry stakeholders, property owners, and state and local government officials involved in the administration of property taxes.

Property taxes can represent a significant ongoing cost for PV system owners, and under some circumstances may prove to be a determining factor in whether or not a facility is built. Many states have adopted policies specifically addressing how different types of PV systems should be valued for property tax purposes. However, the other states have not adopted such policies, and even explicit policies sometimes fail to fully address the myriad of different circumstances present in the current PV market. The frequent lack of clarity presents challenges for both owners of PV systems and government officials involved in the administration of property taxes, as each seeks to ascertain the appropriate treatment for solar PV systems and understand the implications it holds. The report covers how different states classify, assess, and tax PV property, the relative burden of property taxes in different jurisdictions, issues which complicate the assessment and taxation process, and strategies for resolving these issues.

 

Click here to read the entire report

Case Study: Solar in small communities

Posted on: May 16th, 2013 by shannon No Comments

 

The Solar in Small Communities: River Falls, WI case study explores the City of River Falls’ efforts to stimulate a local solar market, with a focus on the River Falls Municipal Utility (RFMU) Solar Feed-in Tariff program.  Together, RFMU, the local government, and the citizens of River Falls have developed a suite of energy programs for the community over the past 12 years.  Their success and continued dedication serves as a strong example of how a small community can work with its municipal utility to accelerate the development of a solar industry.

This case study was created as part of the North Carolina Solar Center’s efforts under the SunShot Solar Outreach Partnership, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s SunShot Initiative. As a member of this partnership, the North Carolina Solar Center provides information and technical expertise to local governments interested in implementing solar programs and policies.

Click here to read the entire case study.

Case study: What is the value of solar?

Posted on: May 16th, 2013 by shannon No Comments

The What is the Value of Solar?: Austin, Texas case study examines the Value of Solar tariff offered to Austin Energy’s residential solar customers in place of net metering. The Value of Solar tariff is an effort to move beyond net metering and more accurately measure the tangible and intangible benefits that solar energy systems add to an electric grid. The case study explains the design, development and implementation of the Austin Energy VOS and examines how replicable the tariff could be for state and local governments looking to encourage solar energy development.

This case study was created as part of the North Carolina Solar Center’s efforts under the SunShot Solar Outreach Partnership, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s SunShot Initiative. As a member of this partnership, the North Carolina Solar Center provides information and technical expertise to local governments interested in implementing solar programs and policies.

Click here to read the entire case study.

Push to end NC’s renewable energy program ends in NC House committee

Posted on: April 25th, 2013 by shannon No Comments

RALEIGH — The push to terminate North Carolina’s renewables program is over for the foreseeable future after a House committee in the state legislature defeated the measure with the help of key Republicans.

The vote in Raleigh was closely watched by national conservative organizations that had targeted North Carolina as the first domino in a national strategy of toppling green-energy policies in more than two dozen states.

Sixteen conservative organizations – including the American Conservative Union, Americans for Tax Reform and The Heartland Institute – made a final push for North Carolina’s bill this week with a letter urging lawmakers that it was their “moral obligation” to oppose government programs that interfere with free markets.

Despite the presence of a pair of Americans for Prosperity representatives on hand to remind lawmakers that “other states are watching,” the bill was defeated with the help of a half-dozen Republicans, including three of the most powerful legislators in the state House.

The Committee on Public Utilities and Energy voted 18-13 on Wednesday to kill the proposal that would have ended the state’s 6-year-old policy of subsidizing solar farms and other forms of renewable energy.

After the vote, Dallas Woodhouse, North Carolina director for the Arlington, Va.-based Americans for Prosperity, could barely contain his anger.

“This was a horrible vote by Republicans, and they need to be held accountable,” Woodhouse said. “And that’s all I’m going to say.”

Those who voted against ending the state’s renewables program included longtime supporters of solar power and other clean technologies. Also voting against were those who are wary of dismantling a complex state policy, which had taken months to negotiate, after a brief 30-minute debate.

But the nays also included Republicans whose districts have recruited businesses and added jobs during a severe economic downturn as a result of the program. Since its adoption in 2007, the state’s renewables policy has turned North Carolina into the nation’s fifth-largest developer of solar energy.

“It was based off local issues back home,” Rep. Tim Moore of Cleveland County, who also chairs the powerful House Rules Committee, said after the vote. “I would have had a difficult time talking to a CEO who just brought 300 jobs to Cleveland County [and telling him] that I’m going to vote to eliminate this program that justified their investment.”

Other Republican leaders voting against the bill were Conference Leader Ruth Samuelson of Mecklenburg County and Wake County’s Nelson Dollar, senior chairman of the House Appropriations Committee.

Samuelson said she had expected the vote to go either way by a single vote.

“It’s a very complicated issue,” she said, “and we were only getting one side of it.”

 

Hager’s fight for the bill

The chairman of the Public Utilities Committee, Rep. Mike Hager of Rutherford County, has met resistance on the bill ever since he introduced it two months ago. He delayed scheduling votes and several times watered down the proposal to make it more palatable.

With Wednesday’s vote taking place in a committee Hager runs as chairman, where he can schedule or withhold colleague’s bills, his legislation was thought to have the equivalent of a home-field advantage.

Hager, a former engineer for Duke Energy, said the bill would end a state policy of subsidies for industries that will never be able to compete with natural gas and nuclear power. He said the state is achieving little but increasing utility bills to subsidize developers of alternative energy.

“Do you want your kids, your grandkids, your great-grandkids paying a subsidy that lasts forever?” Hager asked members of his committee. “If you feed the bears, they don’t know how to look for food anywhere else.”

State law requires that at least 12.5 percent of retail power sales of electric utilities come from renewables and energy efficiency programs by 2021. Hager suggested shrinking the mandate to 3 percent, then said he could live with a 6 percent cap.

In Wednesday’s version, Hager agreed to keep the standard at 12.5 percent, to be dropped to zero in 2021. Under that version, Duke Energy and others could let their existing energy contracts run out and wouldn’t have to renew deals to buy or generate more electricity from solar, wind, biomass or offset by conservation programs.

Hager left the meeting room immediately after the vote and wasn’t available for comment.

 

Constituent concerns

Moore said he almost always votes with Hager, but told his colleague before the committee meeting that he could not support the elimination of the state’s renewable energy policy. His district includes a $27 million manufacturing facility in Shelby being developed by Schletter, an Arizona company that makes mounts and brackets for solar farms.

Moore said the expansion of solar farms is popular with farmers in his district and with his local chamber of commerce.

Before the vote, John Morrison, chief operating officer for Chapel Hill-based Strata Solar, told the committee his company is the fourth-largest solar developer in the nation, thanks to the state’s policy.

He also said that the cost of solar power has dropped significantly in recent years, and noted that the subsidy in electricity rates for solar is almost down to zero for solar farms now under development.

 

Power company costs

The 2007 state law that requires renewables allows electric utilities to collect the costs from customers, just as the utilities recover their costs for building transmission lines and power plants.

Currently Duke Energy residential customers pay 22 cents a month, while Progress Energy residential customers pay 42 cents a month, to subsidize renewables.

Duke’s commercial customers pay $3.29 a month, and Progress’s commercial customers pay $7.28 a month.

Duke’s industrial customers pay $20.29, and Progress’s pay $34.32 a month.

These subsidies represent a premium paid to make the projects profitable.

The program has catapulted solar farms to the forefront of the state’s energy landscape, but electricity produced from wind, poultry waste and swine waste is still in the early stages.

Democratic Rep. Paul Luebke of Durham, who voted against Hager’s bill, said he was pleased by the wide margin of defeat.

“It is the first victory in three years that I’ve had,” Luebke said. “It was refreshing to see a bipartisan majority.”

 

Written by: Raleigh News & Observer

New case study examines how medium-sized communities can enable solar development

Posted on: April 4th, 2013 by shannon No Comments

The Solar in Small Communities:Gaston County, NC case study examines how a medium-sized community can enable and encourage solar development in their community. The case study aims to share Gaston County’s efforts with other local governments as a testimony to the successful installation of solar energy on a local government facility and details the lessons learned from the experience. The case study also provides guidance for other local governments looking to install solar energy on municipal property.

This case study was created as part of the North Carolina Solar Center’s efforts under the SunShot Solar Outreach Partnership, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s SunShot Initiative. As a member of this partnership, the North Carolina Solar Center provides information and technical expertise to local governments interested in implementing solar programs and policies.

Case Study: Solar in Small Communities

Posted on: March 7th, 2013 by shannon No Comments

 

The Solar in Small Communities: Columbia, MO case study examines how a medium-sized community can enable and encourage solar development in their community. The case study aims to share  Columbia’s efforts with other local governments as a testimony to the impact local governments can have on a state solar market. The primary focus is on the unique efforts that it has made using its municipal utility, which include creating a utility renewable energy standard with a specific solar target, authorizing net metering, offering solar rebates to customers, and pursuing solar PPAs with local commercial businesses and installations on city government property.

This case study was created as part of the N.C. Solar Center’s efforts under the SunShot Solar Outreach Partnership, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s SunShot Initiative. As a member of this partnership, the North Carolina Solar Center provides information and technical expertise to local governments interested in implementing solar programs and policies.

Click here to read the case study.

Newly Updated Web-Based Tool Helps Examine Best Use of Incentive Dollars for On-site Wind

Posted on: October 10th, 2012 by shannon No Comments

 

New York and Massachusetts increase rank while California and Vermont scale back

Comparing the combined impact of state and federal policies for small-scale wind is now easier thanks to a recent facelift of the Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool, available at www.windpolicytool.org. Oregon, New York, and Massachusetts show the most favorable net cost of energy (COE) for small wind projects, while recent changes to incentives in California and Vermont have worsened those states’ market environment compared to previous years.

The tool was developed with the support of the Department of Energy’s Wind and Water Power Program as a collaborative project of eFormative Options, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the North Carolina Clean Energy Technology Center.  First released in 2011, the Policy Tool is a one-stop shop for information related to the cost, policies, incentives and other details associated with smaller, consumer-owned wind power generation. Data is pooled from various sources and the numbers are crunched to determine key financial results for each state, including the number of years to simple payback, the cost of energy (COE), the internal rate of return, and net present value. The Policy Tool was created to help policymakers, industry representatives and advocates better understand the key differences that exist between states’ distributed wind policies and keep tabs on the complex, ever-changing landscape.

In the newly released Policy Tool Version 2.0, data are updated to better reflect the current state of affairs across the U.S. And now the Policy Tool has more user-friendly features, such as a slider bar to adjust the Annual Energy Production (AEP) and pop-up windows that define various acronyms and terms for quick reference.

New updates for DSIRE

Posted on: August 30th, 2011 by shannon No Comments

The new, redesigned DSIRE Solar Policy Guide was just launched this week. The DSIRE Solar Policy Guide describes policy options adopted by state and local governments to encourage solar deployment, discusses status and trends of individual policies, provides examples of specific programs, and links to additional sources of information. This guide is meant to serve as a living document and will be updated quarterly to reflect new solar policy initiatives, trends, and resources.

This guide was developed in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) “Solar Powering Your Community: A Guide for Local Governments“. The DOE guide focuses on policies and program options that are important to the development of a local market for solar. These two guides were designed to be complementary and address policy options relevant to both local and state governments.

In addition, the energy policy program at the N.C. Solar Center in collaboration with NREL and the DOE, created and launched the new DSIRE search widget. The DSIRE search widget can easily be incorporated into web sites and blogs. It allows your site’s users or your blog’s audience to search the DSIRE database for incentives in any U.S. state or territory.