Posts Tagged ‘Solar’

N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center Releases Q1 Solar Policy Update to “The 50 States of Solar”

Posted on: April 29th, 2015 by shannonhelm

 

Raleigh, N.C. (April 29, 2015) – The N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center announced the release of the quarterly installment of “The 50 States of Solar: A Quarterly Look at America’s Fast-Evolving Distributed Solar Policy Conversation.”

This report is the most comprehensive and up-to-date overview of the rapidly-evolving state policy landscape for distributed solar. It includes links to track what is happening at the state legislative and regulatory level through the end of Q1 2015. The 50 States of Solar was prepared by the Center’s Energy Policy team, which also manages the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency, and Meister Consultants Group of Boston, Massachusetts.

 

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The report provides details on 70 instances in 39 states, Washington DC, and 2 U.S. territories of formally proposed or enacted regulatory and legislative state-level distribute solar policy changes during Q1 2015.

“Distributed solar policy is at a crucial juncture,” said Benjamin Inskeep, Energy Policy Analyst at the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center. “As solar continues its unprecedented boom across North Carolina and the country, regulators and legislatures are now examining issues like how to integrate increasing amounts of solar on the grid, compensate owners for electricity they generate, and ensure electricity rates are well designed. While several general trends are emerging, our report demonstrates that every state is forging a unique path in how they address these issues.”

Key Details From The 50 States of Solar

Table 1 below taken from the report summarizes the distributed solar policies included in the report.

 

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The report found that there were 22 states with proposed or finalized legislative or regulatory changes to net energy metering or community solar policies during Q1 2015. Meanwhile, 15 states had legislative or regulatory-led efforts studying the value of solar, net metering rules, or distributed generation policy.

The report found that many utilities across the U.S. are proposing increased fixed customer charges for residential users. Of the 24 total instances proposed or decided in the past six months, the average existing monthly residential fixed charge was $10.37, and the average proposed fixed charge was $19.18—an average proposed increase of 58 percent.

In addition, there were five instances in which utilities requested or received added charges specific to customers installing rooftop solar PV. Five states had introduced or passed legislation related to expanding options for third-party solar sales, and three states had action related to utility programs for solar PV on residential rooftops.

Box 1 below taken from the report highlights five notable distributed solar policy developments from Q1 2015.

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About the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center

The N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center, as part of the College of Engineering at North Carolina State University, advances a sustainable energy economy by educating, demonstrating and providing support for clean energy technologies, practices and policies. It serves as a resource for innovative, green energy technologies through technology demonstration, technical assistance, outreach and training. For more information about the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center, visit: http://www.nccleantech.ncsu.edu. Twitter: @NCCleanTech

Compare solar quotes online and save

Posted on: April 28th, 2015 by shannonhelm

 

The Center has partnered with EnergySage to make it easier for North Carolinians to go solar and to help NC solar companies find interested customers.

 

The Center is working to advance a sustainable energy economy by educating, demonstrating and providing support for clean energy technologies, practices and policies. To achieve this, the Center has partnered with EnergySage. The EnergySage Marketplace gets you quotes online from multiple, pre-screened local installers and helps you compare the offers in an apples-to-apples format, so you get the best deal. It’s free to use!

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North Carolina Clean Energy Technology Center Launches New DSIRE Website

Posted on: March 3rd, 2015 by shannonhelm

 

RALEIGH, N.C. (March 3, 2015) – Established in 1995, the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE) is the most comprehensive source of information related to policies and incentives that support the nation’s use of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies.

Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the DSIRE database and website implemented multiple enhancements during the past year. Today, the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center is launching a new and improved DSIRE website. In addition to the informative and timely policy summaries that our nearly 200,000 monthly users have come to rely on, the website now features new tools and resources to make our research even more accessible and useful:

• Find relevant policies and incentives by entering a ZIP code.

• Sort through nearly 2,800 active policies and incentives by applying various filters to search results.

• Access machine-readable, quantitative incentive data for all renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies.

• Build our open data into your websites and tools with our Application Program Interface (API).

• Build policy maps in real-time based on the current policy and incentive data in the database.

• Subscribe to specific policies and incentives to know when and how they have changed.

These enhancements contribute to Federal open data initiatives. The federal government views open data as an important national asset to fuel entrepreneurship, innovation, scientific discovery, and economic growth. The new DSIRE API and open data will support private sector entrepreneurs, technologists, and innovators to build new tools, services, and infrastructure that advance a clean energy economy.

 

Click here to join us on March 12 at 2:00 PM EST to learn more about DSIRE and see a live demonstration of the new website.

 

About the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center

The N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center, as part of the College of Engineering at North Carolina State University, advances a sustainable energy economy by educating, demonstrating and providing support for clean energy technologies, practices and policies. It serves as a resource for innovative, green energy technologies through technology demonstration, technical assistance, outreach and training. For more information about the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center, visit: http://www.nccleantech.ncsu.edu. Twitter: @NCCleanTech

 

Media Contact: Shannon Helm, 919-423-8340, shannon_helm@ncsu.edu

NC Clean Energy Technology Center Ranks the Financial Value of Solar to Homeowners in America’s 50 Largest Cities

Posted on: January 7th, 2015 by shannonhelm

 

RALEIGH, N.C. (January 7, 2015) – Today, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s SunShot Solar Outreach Partnership (SolarOPs), the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center (formerly the N.C. Solar Center) announced the release of “Going Solar in America: Ranking Solar’s Value to Consumers in America’s Largest Cities,” the first of two Going Solar in America reports. The report was generously funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s SunShot Solar Outreach Partnership (SolarOPs).

Despite the fact that solar PV hardware has become less expensive, the non-hardware “soft” costs of solar can account for up to 64% of total system cost, creating a major barrier to greater deployment nationwide. One of the most significant drivers of soft costs is the lack of familiarity with solar PV technology amongst residential customers. In general, these costs, often known as customer acquisition costs, remain high due to the fact that most homeowners and community leaders are unaware of solar’s significant “dollars and cents” value.

Using the most current solar pricing data available (generously provided by the online solar market EnergySage), the Center has designed a ranking system for determining the “dollars and cents” value of investing in solar in these fifty cities. The rankings themselves are based on three metrics: (1) first-year average monthly bill savings, (2) the overall present-day value of a long-term investment in solar (as compared to an investment in a stock with an average return), and (3) the average or “levelized” cost of energy from a rooftop solar energy system.

The ten cities where solar offers the best financial value, according to our methodology are:

1. New York, NY
2. Boston, MA
3. Albuquerque, NM
4. San Jose, CA
5. Las Vegas, NV
6. Washington, DC
7. Los Angeles, CA
8. San Diego, CA
9. Oakland, CA
10. San Francisco, CA

“There are a wide variety of factors that determine how good a deal solar is in your city- upfront cost, solar resource, electricity rates, availability of net metering, incentives, to name a few,” said Autumn Proudlove, the report’s co-author.

The information that serves as the basis for these rankings strongly suggests that rooftop solar is an excellent long-term investment for homeowners across a variety of income levels and backgrounds. According to data from America’s largest solar markets, over 60% of all new solar PV installations are occurring in middle-class neighborhoods that have median incomes ranging from $40,000 to $90,000.

“Right now, buying an average-sized, fully-financed solar PV system costs less than electricity from their local utility for 93% of single-family homeowners in America’s 50 largest cities, and in most places, is a better investment than many of the stocks that are in their 401(k),” said Jim Kennerly, project manager for the Going Solar in America reports. “Nevertheless, most people are unaware that solar is this affordable for people of all walks of life. We hope that this report will help to close this critical information gap and reduce soft costs.”

 

To obtain a full copy of the report and rankings, please click here.

 

About the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center
The N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center, as part of the College of Engineering at North Carolina State University, advances a sustainable energy economy by educating, demonstrating and providing support for clean energy technologies, practices and policies. It serves as a resource for innovative, green energy technologies through technology demonstration, technical assistance, outreach and training. For more information about the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center, visit: http://www.nccleantech.ncsu.edu. Twitter: @NCCleanTech
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Media Contact: Shannon Helm, N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center, 919-423-8340, shannon_helm@ncsu.edu

New Resources for Promoting Solar-Friendly North Carolina Homeowners’ Associations

Posted on: September 30th, 2014 by shannonhelm

 

RALEIGH, NC (September 30, 2014) -– Working under the U.S. Department of Energy’s SunShot Solar Outreach Partnership, the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center (formerly the N.C. Solar Center) and The Solar Foundation today announced the release of two new resources for North Carolina homeowners’ associations. The first, a short brochure entitled The Benefits of Going Solar: A Resource for North Carolina Homeowners’ Associations, outlines the substantial financial and environmental benefits attached to investments in residential solar. Complementing this resource is a set of model design guidelines aimed at providing HOAs with a strong starting point for developing their own solar policies.

North Carolina currently has just over 11 megawatts of residential solar photovoltaic capacity, with about 15 percent of this total installed in the first half of 2014 alone. As demand for residential solar continues to grow across the state, more homeowners’ associations are finding the need to adopt design rules that accommodate their residents’ desire to “go solar” while still protecting legitimate competing community interests. To help fulfill this need, the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center and The Solar Foundation are leading an educational outreach campaign for HOAs throughout North Carolina. With these resources, HOA board members and architectural review committees will better understand the benefits solar can provide to their communities and get a head-start on drafting solar-friendly design guidelines that also address the legitimate concerns of the community.

“What we are finding with many community associations is that they are generally receptive to seeing more residential solar, but are unsure how to allow this development to occur in a balanced way,” said Philip Haddix, Program Director with The Solar Foundation. “It is our hope that our model guidelines and continued efforts to engage associations across the state will go a long way in helping folks better understand and think through these issues.”

Last Thursday, representatives from the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center, The Solar Foundation, and the Rose Walk HOA in Carrboro presented on the role of HOAs in solar development at the North Carolina Community Associations Institute (N.C. CAI) conference in Durham. A large number of copies of both documents were distributed to attendees and the messages and recommendations conveyed within were well-received.

“If the residential solar market is going to take off like utility-scale solar has here in North Carolina, we’ll need to minimize barriers,” said Autumn Proudlove, Policy Analyst at the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center. “We hope that HOAs will utilize these resources to create their own solar guidelines that facilitate solar installations while addressing other community interests.”

To obtain a copy of these resources, please click here. North Carolina community associations interested in learning about these efforts and possibly receiving assistance in bringing more solar to their communities can contact Philip Haddix (phaddix@solarfound.org) or Autumn Proudlove (afproudl@ncsu.edu).

 

About the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center

The N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center, as part of the College of Engineering at North Carolina State University, advances a sustainable energy economy by educating, demonstrating and providing support for clean energy technologies, practices and policies. It serves as a resource for innovative, green energy technologies through technology demonstration, technical assistance, outreach and training. For more information about the N.C. Clean Energy Technology Center, visit: http://www.nccleantech.ncsu.edu. Twitter: @NCCleanTech

About The Solar Foundation

The Solar Foundation (TSF) is a leading provider of high-quality economic impact analyses on the solar industry, a trusted technical assistance provider for public sector implementation, and a solar schools champion. Founded in 1977 as an independent nonprofit, its mission is to increase understanding of solar energy through strategic research that educates the public and transforms markets. While TSF recognizes that solar energy is a key part of our energy future, it is committed to excellence in its aim to help the public fairly and objectively gauge the value of the solar industry worldwide. More at: www.TheSolarFoundation.org

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What the Duke Energy project means for Strata Solar and N.C.

Posted on: September 17th, 2014 by shannonhelm

The $500 million, 550-acre, 850,000 solar panel project announced by Duke Energy on Monday will be the biggest solar project in North Carolina – and east of the Mississippi River – but it means more for economic development than for Strata Solar, or the market itself.

John Morrison, vice president of marketing and sales for Chapel Hill-based Strata Solar says it doesn’t change the scale of projects the company will proceed with.
“It’s certainly much, much bigger than what we’ve done historically,” he says. “But we’ll continue in the same vein we’ve been in. We’ll continue to build the sort of solar we’ve been doing here in North Carolina.”
While that means bringing a new solar farm online every 10 days, they tend to be in the range of 5-8 megawatts, powering around 600 homes. The Duke Energy farm will consist of 80 megawatts, enough to power 10,000 homes over the course of a year.

Morrison says it’s mostly about the economic development, creating 300-500 jobs in areas of the state that are rural and where jobs are hard to come by. And while careers are being built, the project won’t elevate North Carolina’s ranking among the top solar states in the nation.

“There are lots of states and regions that recognize the economic development benefit that comes from solar,” says Morrison. “There are other states and regions watching the state, like Alabama, Tennessee, Mississippi and Virginia. I’m sure they’d like to see similar investments. This growth in the state has been in the past three years. Strata Solar is approaching $2 billion in solar investments in North Carolina. I mean, four years ago, nobody would have dreamed that would be possible. But this project won’t change our ranking among other states. It will help us hold our own as solar continues to become cheaper.”

 

Triangle Business Journal

Duke Energy commits $500 million to N.C. solar power expansion

Posted on: September 17th, 2014 by shannonhelm

Duke Energy Corp. (NYSE:DUK) is making a $500 million commitment to a major expansion of solar power in North Carolina.

The company will acquire and construct three solar facilities — totaling 128 megawatts of capacity — including the largest solar photovoltaic facility east of the Mississippi River. The three facilities will be in Bladen, Duplin and Wilson counties.

Duke also signed power-purchase agreements for five new solar projects in the state, representing 150 megawatts of capacity.

Together, the eight projects will have a capacity of 278 megawatts. The $500 million commitment includes the investment in the three facilities and the value of the five long-term power-purchase contracts.

“This is Duke Energy’s largest single announcement for solar power and represents a 60 percent increase in the amount of solar power for our North Carolina customers,” Rob Caldwell, senior vice president, Distributed Energy Resources, said in a statement Monday morning. “We are bringing large amounts of renewable energy onto our system in the most cost-effective way possible.”

The solar commitments are the result of Charlotte-based Duke’s request for proposals issued in February for new solar capacity. The company says the initiative will help further its commitment to renewable energy, diversify its energy portfolio and meet North Carolina’s Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard.

Duke Energy will own the following projects:

  • 65-megawatt Warsaw Solar Facility developed by Strata Solar in Duplin County.
  • 40-megawatt Elm City Solar Facility developed by HelioSage Energy in Wilson County.
  • 23-megawatt Fayetteville Solar Facility developed by Tangent Energy Solutions in Bladen County.

The Warsaw Solar Facility will be the largest solar photovoltaic plant east of the Mississippi River.

“We are very excited to be working with Duke Energy on this tremendous solar project,” said Markus Wilhelm, chief executive officer of Chapel Hill-based Strata Solar. “Three years ago, we celebrated with Duke Energy at the completion of our first 5-megawatt solar farm in Cleveland County — and Strata recently passed the 325-megawatt mark with more than 65 farms generating power in the Southeast. We take a lot of pride in our work, and we are thrilled to be announcing this partnership between Strata Solar and Duke Energy on what will be the largest solar farm on the East Coast.”

Duke Energy will purchase power from these new projects:

  • Innovative Solar Systems’ 48-megawatt plant in Bladen County.
  • FLS Energy’s 48-megawatt plant in Richmond County.
  • Birdseye Renewable Energy’s 20-megawatt plant in Scotland County.
  • Birdseye Renewable Energy’s 19-megawatt plant in Cleveland County.
  • Element Power US’s 15-megawatt plant in Beaufort County.

In addition to those five power-purchase agreements, Duke Energy has signed 33 other agreements in North Carolina in 2014 for projects totaling 109 megawatts of capacity.

Duke’s RFP targeted solar facilities greater than 5 megawatts. The RFP was limited to projects that were in the company’s current transmission and distribution queue.

“We were able to pursue the most promising projects in North Carolina,” Caldwell said. “These will be among the largest solar projects in the state, allowing us to take advantage of greater size and scale.”

For projects Duke will own, the company must obtain approval from the N.C. Utilities Commission.

Duke will then take ownership of the facilities and be responsible for building and having them in operation by the end of 2015. No utilities commission approval is needed for the company’s power-purchase agreements.

 

Charlotte Business Journal

Universities in DC make deal with Duke Energy to buy solar power

Posted on: June 24th, 2014 by shannonhelm

 

WASHINGTON — Two universities in the nation’s capital have agreed to a major energy deal to buy more than half their power from three new solar power farms that will be built in North Carolina, the schools announced Monday night.

George Washington University, American University and the George Washington University Hospital announced the 20-year agreement with Duke Energy Renewables to reduce their carbon footprints by directly tapping solar energy.

The Capital Partners Solar Project will break ground this summer near Elizabeth City, North Carolina. Once fully operational in 2015 with 243,000 solar panels, the three solar farms are expected to generate 123 million kilowatt hours of electricity per year. Planners said that translates to eliminating about 60,000 metric tons of carbon emissions per year or taking 12,500 cars off the road.

The Solar Energy Industries Association, a trade group, said this is the nation’s largest nonutility solar power purchase. It will also create the largest photovoltaic solar power operation east of the Mississippi River.

“We’ll be directly sourcing our electricity from three solar energy sites,” said George Washington University President Steven Knapp. “We’re not just buying certificates for renewable energy. We’re actually directly sourcing from renewable energy. The impact of that is pretty huge.”

Solar power generated in North Carolina will move into the Washington region’s electrical grid for the universities. An equivalent amount of conventional electricity will be withdrawn from the same electric grid.

The 20-year deal provides fixed pricing for solar energy at a lower price than the schools currently pay for power, thanks in part to its large scale. Over the full 20-year term, university officials are hoping the shift to solar could yield millions of dollars in savings as the cost of conventional power is expected to rise.

George Washington University spent about $13 million last year on electricity, and American University spends about $5 million.

Both universities have been looking for renewable energy sources for several years. At one time, American University considered buying a wind farm. But the deal with Duke Energy Renewables won’t require up-front capital costs for either school. It resulted from a competitive bidding process that included about 28 companies representing both wind and solar power, Knapp said.

American University President Neil Kerwin said the school is pursuing an aggressive goal to become carbon-neutral by the year 2020.

“We felt an institution our size in partnership with one the size of GW could send a pretty strong message about both the feasibility and the wisdom of both the partnership and the move toward renewable sources of energy,” Kerwin said.

Alex Perera, a renewable energy expert at the World Resources Institute, said the university partnership for a large-scale solar-power purchase could provide a model for other schools or large institutions to buy renewable energy directly.

“These kinds of long-term contracts from good-credit buyers can really be helpful to renewable energy developers in helping them get the financing they need to get projects built,” he said. “It also allows buyers to get more value out of renewable energy.”

By BRETT ZONGKER, Associated Press

N.C. Solar Center Releases Residential Customer Guides to Going Solar

Posted on: April 24th, 2014 by shannonhelm No Comments

 

Raleigh, N.C. – As part of its work under the U.S. Department of Energy’s SunShot Solar Outreach Partnership, the N.C. Solar Center today announces the release of two new original resources: A Residential Customer’s Guide to Going Solar: Duke Energy Carolinas version and A Residential Customer’s Guide to Going Solar: Duke Energy Progress version.

North Carolina was ranked second in the nation for installed solar capacity in 2013, installing 400 MW of new capacity and climbing up three places from 2012 (according to the NPD Solarbuzz North American PV Markets Quarterly report). Most of this capacity in North Carolina comes from utility-scale solar installations, which highlights an opportunity to advance solar even more in the state by focusing on rooftop installations. These guides will support this effort by educating customers about solar and clarifying many of the misconceptions about the cost of going solar.

The guides focus on explaining, in easy to understand terms, the different financial options available to homeowners interested in going solar. These are broken up into incentives that reduce the upfront cost of going solar, such as tax credits and Duke Energy Progress’ SunSense program, and payback options that credit you for the energy produced by your solar photovoltaic (PV) system, like net metering and N.C. GreenPower.

In addition to a description of these options, the guides include a detailed analysis of the monthly and long-term utility bill savings that each option provides to the typical homeowner, using data specific to North Carolina cities. This allows customers to get an idea of how much a solar system costs in their particular region after all available incentives are factored in, as well as what kind of utility bill savings a typical PV owner in their area sees.

Overall, the guides show that with an average-sized residential system at typical market prices, customers of Duke Energy in North Carolina can save up to an average of $55/ month for the next 25 years on their utility bill with a system that can cost as little as $4,000, after incentives.

Versions of the guides can be viewed here: Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress. For more information about the Department of Energy’s SunShot Solar Outreach Partnership, please visit www.solaroutreach.org.

 

About the North Carolina Solar Center

The North Carolina Solar Center, as part of the College of Engineering at North Carolina State University advances a sustainable energy economy by educating, demonstrating and providing support for clean energy technologies, practices, and policies. It serves as a resource for innovative, green energy technologies through technology demonstration, technical assistance, outreach and training. For more information about the N.C. Solar Center visit: http://www.ncsc.ncsu.edu. Twitter: @NCSolarCenter

 

Media Contact: Shannon Helm, N.C. Solar Center, 919-423-8340, shannon_helm@ncsu.edu

New Guidance on Permitting Provides Boon for Local Governments, Solar Developers

Posted on: January 6th, 2014 by shannonhelm No Comments

 

 

Template solar ordinance offers adaptable roadmap for solar energy development with a local twist

RALEIGH – The NC Solar Center (NCSC) and the NC Sustainable Energy Association (NCSEA) released a Template Solar Energy Development Ordinance that addresses some of the most common considerations that arise in the permitting of solar energy facilities. It is intended to offer a path that could facilitate solar project development for companies and landowners while simultaneously creating a framework for local governments to ensure the safeguarding of local values and interests.

The template ordinance represents months of collaboration among multiple stakeholders including solar industry representatives, state government agencies, local planning communities, legal experts, and other non-profit groups. However, the project stopped deliberately short of proposing the resulting template ordinance as a prescriptive approach, suggesting its value instead as an expert guide.

“The template is a unique tool for local governments that are researching how best to design their own solar ordinance and need a model that is tailored to the state,” said Michael Fucci, Regulatory and Market Analyst for NCSEA. “It is also a ‘win’ for companies that can now rely on the template in jurisdictions where a lack of understanding of how to regulate solar development may otherwise have posed a significant barrier to entry.”

Throughout the drafting process NCSEA and NCSC provided drafts of the template to numerous jurisdictions eager to take advantage of the resource. County officials have already used the template ordinance to help them better prepare to manage commercial solar development responsibly while still maintaining the support of solar developers. In 2013 North Carolina installed more solar than 47 other states, and even more solar is expected to be installed in the state in 2014.

“Due to this solar boom, local governments across NC have significant interest in better understanding solar energy,” said Tommy Cleveland, Renewable Energy Project Coordinator at NCSC. “Now that the template ordinance is published we expect to see even greater interest and are well prepared to offer support to interested jurisdictions.”

The Template Solar Ordinance and a historical report detailing key decision points are available on the NCSEA and NCSC sites.

 

About the North Carolina Solar Center:

The North Carolina Solar Center, as part of the College of Engineering at North Carolina State University advances a sustainable energy economy by educating, demonstrating and providing support for clean energy technologies, practices, and policies. It serves as a resource for innovative, green energy technologies through technology demonstration, technical assistance, outreach and training. For more information visit: http://www.ncsc.ncsu.edu.  Twitter: @NCSolarCenter

 

About the NC Sustainable Energy Association:

Founded in 1978, the NC Sustainable Energy Association (NCSEA) is a 501(c)3 non-profit membership organization of individuals, businesses, government and non-profits working to ensure a sustainable future by promoting renewable energy and energy efficiency in North Carolina through education, public policy and economic development. Learn more at www.energync.org

 

Contact: 

Shannon Helm, NC Solar Center, Shannon_Helm@ncsu.edu, 919-423-8340

Lowell Sachs, NCSEA,  lowell@energync.org, 919-832-7601 Ext.117

 

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